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Clamagore SS-343 - History

Clamagore SS-343 - History


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Clamagore

A blue parrot-fish found in the West Indies and Chesapeake Bay.

(SS-343: dp. 1,526, 1. 311'9" b. 27'3"; dr. 15'3", s. 20
k.; cpl. 66; a. 10 21" tt.; cl. Cato)

Clamagore (SS-343) was launched 25 February 1945 by Electric Boat Co., Groton, Conn., sponsored by Miss M. J. Jacobs, and commissioned 28 June 1945, Commander S. C, Loomis, Jr., in command.

Clamagore reported to Key West, her assigned base 5 September 1945. She operated off Key West with various fleet units and with the Fleet Sonar School, voyaging on occasion to Cuba and the Virgin Islands until 5 December 1947, when she entered Philadelphia Naval Shipyard for modernization and installation of snorkel. Clamagore returned to Key West 6 August 1948 and assumed local and Caribbean operations for the next 8 years, except for a tour of duty in the Mediterranean from 3 February to 16 April 1953.

Clamagore called at New London and Newport early in 1957, returning to Key West 13 March. Between 23 September and 7 December she took part in NATO exercises in the North Atlantic, calling at Portsmouth, England, and Argentia, Newfoundland. On 29 June 1959, she arrived at Charleston, her new home port, and after a period of coastwise operations, sailed 5 April 1960 to join the 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean for a tour of duty which continued until July, when the submarine returned to Charleston. For the remainder of 1960 Clamagore operated off the east coast.


Clamagore SS-343 - History

To make a contribution by check, make payable to CRAMA and mail to
CRAMA, PO Box 60388,
N. Charleston, SC 29419

To make an on-line donation click on DONATE below

The following is a blog-post from Mister Mac. He runs a blog called THELEANSUBMARINER and posts great stories and very intersting observations concering all things Submarine. This is his test post of 19 June 2019. After reading this one please link to and follow his all of his posts. Mac is running posts on the 41 For Freedom during 2019.

What’s in a name? : USS Clamagore SS 343

by Mister Mac - What’s in a name? : USS Clamagore SS 343 It’s been hard the last few years seeing the struggle of the Clamagore. There are so few submarines from her era still afloat and even the thought of losing one is hard for those of us who know their place in history. These articles are from […] Read more of this post


Editorial: Saving the Clamagore would be fitting tribute to Charleston area’s naval past
Jun 11, 2019 Updated Jun 11, 2019
By Grace Beahm Alford [email protected]
It’s cheaper to save it than to sink it. That’s the short argument for preserving the Cold War-era
submarine Clamagore as a museum ship rather sinking it off the coast as a fishing reef.
Read the full Editorial HERE

Submariners are Suing South Carolina to Save Cold War-Era Attack Boat
By: Ben Werner, USNI News
April 19, 2019 5:35 PM

A group of retired submariners is fighting the State of South Carolina to keep what is believed to be the last World War II and Cold War-era GUPPY III submarine from forever becoming an underwater playground for fish and SCUBA divers.

Citing the high cost of preserving the 75-year-old former USS Clamagore (SS-343) at a pier across the Cooper River from Charleston, S.C., the sub’s operator, the Patriots Point Development Authority, wants to turn it into an artificial reef off the South Carolina coast, according to court documents obtained by USNI News.

The all-volunteer USS Clamagore SS-343 Restoration and Maintenance Association say, according to a 1979 agreement transferring Clamagore to the state, the sub can’t be sunk without approval from the Secretary of the Navy. Plus, the volunteers are arguing in court they have a better plan to preserve the sub.


To save, relocate and restore the USS CLAMAGORE SS 343. To relocate the submarine from Patriot's Point, Mount Pleasant, SC to a land berth communal with the H.L. HUNLEY museum in North Charleston, SC. To preserve the last of her kind of World War II GUPPY III submarines to a condition suitable to serve as a submarine museum and memorial for future generations.

To make an on-line donation click on DONATE below
To make a contribution by check, make payable to CRAMA and mail to
CRAMA, PO Box 60388, N. Charleston, SC 29419

The USS Clamagore SS-343 currently sits at a pier near the Patroits Point Maritime Museum, Mt. Pleasant, SC. The superstructure has extensive corrosion but the ballast tanks and pressure hull are still intact. None of the maintenance Patriots Point agreed to perform after signing the donation contract has been performed. The Executive Director of Patriots Point, Mac Burdette, has been actively pursuing a way to remove the boat from the Museum. This action was required by the condition he found the submarine in when he took over as Executive Director.

When a group of Charleston area submarine veterans heard that the submarine was going to be sent to Florida to be sunk as a diving reef we banded together to form the USS Clamagore SS-343 Restoration and Maintenance Association, Inc. (CRAMA) . We are incorporated in South Carolina and are a Section 501(c)(3) Non-Profit Charity under the Internal Revenue Service Code. We hope to move the Clamagore to a land berth in order to reduce the maintenance required to keep it open for the public to visit. We hoped to have it in the vicinity of the H. L. Hunley Museum in North Charleston, SC so that after viewing the Hunley visitors could go on board and see modern submarine conditions.

We estimate placing it in a land berth to cost between $1.6M and $2.3M depending on what an initial drydocking shows. Part of this cost could be raised by selling materials not required with the sub in a land berth.

Due to actions taken by Patriots Point after receiving the USS Clamagore, removing the deck hatches and main ballast tank blow piping, the ship is not seaworthy. The only way it can leave the Charleston harbor is on a barge or onboard another ship.

The USS Clamagore SS 343 is the last Balao-class GUPPY III submarine left afloat. Although she did not see service in World War Two she is a representative of the submarines that fought so effectively in the Pacific theater in the war. The submarine did participate in many missions during the Cold War period. She is an example of modern submarine design in that the compartmentation and construction is similar to submarines serving the US Navy today. Since all current US Navy submarines are nuclear powered the possibility of getting a more modern submarine in Charleston for a memorial is negligible.

But why keep it in the Charleston area?

The USS Clamagore can effectively show the development of the modern submarine from the H. L. Hunley, the first submarine to sink a warship.

The USS Clamagore was stationed in Charleston and was overhauled at Charleston Naval Shipyard.

Charleston was a very important Navy installation during the Cold War era with the first deterrent patrol of a Fleet Ballistic Submarine, USS George Washington SSBN 598, leaving from Naval Weapons Station, Charleston. Many submarines were station in the Charleston area and many millions of dollars came into the economy each from the families and sailors stationed on those ships and the support commands.

Properly done the USS Clamagore and a submarine museum dedicated to the history of all submarines could be an international attraction bringing much more into the Charleston area economy than the cost of the museum.


USS Clamagore (SS-343)

Authored By: Staff Writer | Last Edited: 09/01/2016 | Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com | The following text is exclusive to this site.

The Balao-class of diesel-electric submarines serving the United States Navy (USN) during World War 2 (1939-1945) became one of the more important contributors to the war being fought under the waves. One-hundred twenty boats of the class were completed during the span of 1942 to 1946 and these were in commission into the mid-1970s with the USN and other global naval forces before the end. One-hundred nine of the class were ultimately retired (and scrapped) while eight were preserved. Eleven were lost in service.

USS Clamagore (SS-343) was one of the group and laid down on March 16th, 1944 by Electric Boat Company of Groton, Connecticut. Launched on February 25th, 1945, she was commissioned on June 28th, 1945 following her trials. However, with the war in Europe having drawn to a close and the Japanese surrender of August 1945, Clamagore was destined to never see combat service in World War 2. Her first post was in Key West which began her official service tenure and her early work centered on various actions in Caribbean waters.

Her profile was conventional with a tall sail over midships. Dive planes were fitted forward near the bow. Her dimensions included a length of 312 feet, a beam of 27 feet and a draught of 17 feet. Displacement was 1,550 tons when surfaced and 2,460 tons when submerged. Power stemmed from 4 x General motors Model 16-278A V16 diesel engines for surface travel and 4 x General Electric motors for undersea travel. This arrangement drove power to 2 x shafts at the stern.

Internally the crew complement numbered 80 personnel including 10 officers and 70 enlisted. The vessel could stay underwater for some 48 hours and held an endurance of 75 days - useful for long patrol sorties. Range was out to 11,000 nautical miles at 20 knots surfaced and submerged speeds reached nearly 9 knots. The test depth was 400 feet.

Armament-wise, Clamagore was completed with 10 x 21" (533mm) torpedo tubes with six of these facing forward and four of these facing aft. A total of 24 torpedoes were carried. To counter surface threats she was also fielded with 1 x 5" (127mm) /25 caliber deck gun and 40mm Bofors and 20mm Oerlikon guns for close-in defense against incoming enemy aircraft.

USS Clamagore proved valuable during the ensuing Cold War decades, a conflict between the Soviet Union and the West. With the establishment of NATO, a combined military force for western nations, Clamagore saw renewed life and took part in exercises in the North Atlantic and conducted various tours along the American East Coast.

From late 1947 to mid-1948, USS Clamagore was slated for conversion to the new "GUPPY II" standard - the "Greater Underwater Propulsion Power Program" was devised by the USN to increase undersea performance, including endurance and maneuverability, of its boat force. Much was learned from the capture of a pair of Nazi German Type XXI U-boats and this knowledge was pressed into existing American submarine designs. As a whole new class of submarine design was out of the question, it was decided to simply convert existing types like Clamagore. The modifications were begun with the GUPPY I program and ended with the GUPPY III program. Clamagore was part of both GUPPY II and GUPPY III conversion programs.

Following GUPPY II, Clamagore displaced 1,900 tons when surfaced and 2,480 tons when submerged. Her speeds when surfaced / submerged increased to 18 knots and 9 knots, respectively with operational ranges out to 15,000 nautical miles (surfaced). All of her deck gun armament were removed though she retained her ten torpedo tubes. A snorkel was also added during GUPPY II as was the Mk 106 torpedo Fire Control System (FCS). The work was completed at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard.

The GUPPY III work was begun in 1962 and changes to the boat included a 15-foot extension of her hull and installation of passive ranging sonar (BQG-4 PUFFS). This added three fin-like protrusions along her dorsal spine. In her GUPPY III guise, Clamagore's displacement became 2,007 tons surfaced and 2,490 tons submerged. Surfaced speed became 17 knots with 14.5 knots achieved when submerged. Endurance dropped to 36 hours (submerged). Her sensor suite included the BQS-4 active search sonar, the BQR-2B passive search sonar and the BQG-4 passive attack sonar fits.

While twenty-four boats were used in the GUPPY II conversion program, just nine made up the GUPPY III program. The GUPPY III work on Clamagore was completed in February of 1963 and she joined Submarine Squadron 2 based out of Groton.

USS Clamagore finished out her tenure as a surveillance boat and was decommissioned on June 12th, 1973 after a respectable thirty year career. She was struck from the Naval Register on June 27th, 1975 and preserved as a museum ship, stationed at Patriot's Point in Charleston, South Carolina from May 1981 on. Once there, she joined the World War 2 aircraft carrier USS Yorktown (CV-10) and the destroyer USS Laffey (DD-724). She stands as the only preserved GUPPY III submarine in the United States but her condition is rated as quite poor - facing the threat of becoming an underwater reef if repairs to her hull are not made.


Submariners are Suing South Carolina to Save Cold War-Era Attack Boat

This post has been updated to clarify the proposed location of the artificial reef made from the hull of former USS Clamagore. The attack boat was previously planned to be sunk off of Key West, Fla. However, the lawsuit said the proposed location was off the coast of Charleston, S.C.

A group of retired submariners is fighting the State of South Carolina to keep what is believed to be the last World War II and Cold War-era GUPPY III submarine from forever becoming an underwater playground for fish and SCUBA divers.

Citing the high cost of preserving the 75-year-old former USS Clamagore (SS-343) at a pier across the Cooper River from Charleston, S.C., the sub’s operator, the Patriots Point Development Authority, wants to turn it into an artificial reef off the coast of Charleston, S.C., according to court documents obtained by USNI News. Previously, Patriots Point officials had said the submarine would be sunk off of Key West, Fla.

The all-volunteer USS Clamagore SS-343 Restoration and Maintenance Association say, according to a 1979 agreement transferring Clamagore to the state, the sub can’t be sunk without approval from the Secretary of the Navy. Plus, the volunteers are arguing in court they have a better plan to preserve the sub.

For a fraction of the price it will cost to sink Clamagore, the volunteers say they can bring the boat to a nearby drydock, have its hull repaired, according to their lawsuit filed earlier this week in a Charleston County, S.C., court.

“Detyens Shipyards, Inc. has estimated it will only cost $300,000 to transport the submarine to North Charleston, dry dock it, clean, repair and preserve the complete hull,” the volunteers’ lawsuit states.

Their goal is to move Clamagore for display ashore near the H.L. Hunley museum housing the Confederate submarine in North Charleston, S.C., according to the group’s website.

Instead of giving the volunteers a chance to raise funds necessary for the preservation, the suit claims the development authority is intent on asking lawmakers to transfer $2.7 million from the state’s education budget to fund preparations to sink the sub off the Carolina coast.

The Charleston, S.C., Post and Courier first reported the pending lawsuit. A spokesman for the Patriots Point Naval and Maritime Museum did not immediately return a request for comment. U.S. Navy officials told USNI News on Friday they were not aware of any pending request to sink Clamagore.

In 2017, Naval History magazine reported the museum had explored other options for Clamagore and found that scrapping the boat or sinking it as a reef were the only cost-effective options.

“Reefing,” Patriot’s Point Director of Operations Bob Howard, said at the time, is a “dignified way to continue [the Clamagore’s] existence in another mission.”

USS Clamagore in Aug. 7, 2015 at Patriots Point in Mt. Pleasant, S.C. Photo via wikipedia

For nearly 40 years, Clamagore has served as a museum showcasing the rugged conditions common in middle 20th century’s diesel-powered submarine service. The development authority, which operates the Patriots Point Naval and Maritime Museum, also has on display World War II carrier, the former USS Yorktown (CV-10), and destroyer, the former USS Laffey (DD-724). Annually, the about 270,000 people visit the museum, according to the Patriots Point fact sheet.

Clamagore was originally a Balao-class submarine, launched from Electric Boat in Groton, Conn., during the closing days of World War II. In 1948 the sub underwent a greater underwater propulsion program, or GUPPY, upgrade. At first, Clamagore was a GUPPY II and then a GUPPY III when a 15-foot section was added to accommodate new technology, according to U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command. For most of its service, Clamagore nicknamed the “Gray Ghost of the Florida Coast” operated in the Atlantic and Caribbean.

From 1952 to 1954, a newly promoted Lt. William Crowe served aboard Clamagore. Crowe would eventually become Adm. Crowe, the 11th chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff in 1985, according to his biography with the Naval History and Heritage Command.


ALL HANDS Magazine November 1971

USS Clamagore: A teaching submarine

ALTHOUGH still a conventional sub in this age of nuclear power, USS Clamagore (SS 343) has a proud crew. Many men of Clamagore say they wouldn’t leave their present duty assignment for any nuclear-powered submarine in the Fleet. It’s almost as though some of that diesel fuel is flowing in their blood. They know their role in the nation’s defense is an important one.

The men who designed, built and first served in Clamagore back in 1945 would hardly recognize her today, were it not for the telltale number 343 painted on her sail. When first launched, Clamagore cast a typical World War II-style silhouette, easily distinguishable by the deck guns mounted fore and aft of the bridge, and a clipper bow.

Then in 1948, she got her first face-lifting. At the U. S. Naval Shipyard, Philadelphia, she was modified into a Guppy II-type, complete with the then newly developed snorkel system.

Fourteen years later and a lot of water over the bridge, more change was indicated. As one of the old style submarines selected for conversion under the FRAM (Fleet Rehabilitation and Modernization) program, Clamagore was drydocked at the Naval Ship yard, Charleston, SC.

During her five-month stay at NSY Charleston, Clamagore was out completely in two, and a brand new section was inserted amidships. The result: she grew 15 feet in length and gained some 55 tons in weight in adding the space necessary to house the modern equipment (including advanced electronic and communications systems) and new weapons. There’s increased living space too, plus added fuel capacity. In addition, when equipment was placed back aboard following the overhaul, it was done according to the “human engineering” concept — in other words, so located as to be most easily accessible to the operators who use it.

RECOMMISSIONED as a Guppy III in 1962, SS 343 was back in service, fit and ready to provide more years of efficient service to the Fleet. Clamagore, like the rest of the Navy’s diesel-powered submarines, still conducts necessary operations on overseas deployments and off our coastlines.

They are not, by any means, limited to training operations, although Clamagore does train junior officers of Polaris submarines in shiphandling. However, the men of Clamagore know such operations, whether overseas or at their home port at New London, Conn., with SUBRON Two, are vital in protecting this country and at the same time keeping our sailing men the best trained in the world.

Among the varied duties aboard Clamagore: taking periscope bearings, manipulating the air manifold to surface the ship, keeping watch over the area waters, supervising work topside and communicating orders from the bridge. The combined effort keeps the sub running like clockwork.

Four Years after this article was published, the Clamagore would join the rest of her sister ships on the inactive list.

Clamagore was decommissioned on 12 June 1975 and stricken on 27 June 1975 after having served in the Navy for thirty years. She was donated as a museum ship on 6 August 1979.

Clamagore arrived at Patriot’s Point Naval & Maritime Museum, Charleston, South Carolina in May 1981, where she was moored as a museum ship along with aircraft carrier Yorktown and destroyer Laffey.

Clamagore was listed on the National Register of Historic Places and designated a National Historic Landmark on 29 June 1989.

According to the South Carolina Department of Archives and History, Clamagore “is now the only surviving GUPPY type III submarine in the United States. She represents the continued adaptation and use of war-built diesel submarines by the Navy for the first two decades after the war.” The GUPPY conversion submarines constituted the bulk of the nation’s submarine force through the mid-1960s.

On January 10, 2017 the Palm Beach County Commissioners voted unanimously to approve funds for the vessel to be sunk as an artificial reef. It had been planned for the submarine to be pulled out of the water by May 1, 2018.


USS Clamagore could be submerged and transformed into artificial reef by mid-2021

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - The Patriots Point Development Authority is accepting bids from contractors to sink the USS Clamagore and turn it into an artificial reef.

The solicitation documents revealed new details about the timeline for the project and concerns from potential contractors about pending legal proceedings.

PPDA wants preparations for reefing the US Navy Submarine completed by April 15, 2021, giving a selected contractor a little more than a year to finish the project. According to the solicitation, Patriots Point officials want the sub sunk no later than June 1. Officials have told contractors it is critical the reefing occurs before the 2021 hurricane season and that prospective bidders should plan their schedule accordingly to ensure the deadline is met despite any potential delays due to severe storms.

“The structural condition of the USS Clamagore has deteriorated to the to the point where repairing the vessel and retaining it as a state-owned museum is not economically advantageous to the State of South Carolina,” the solicitation states. “After analyzing every option for the future of the submarine, and publicly advertising its availability, reefing the submarine has emerged as the most dignified, affordable option.”

The sub’s final resting place will be approximately 30 to 60 miles from the Charleston Harbor. The South Carolina Department of Natural Resources will determine the exact location, according to the solicitation. However, PPDA officials have told bidders they expect to reef the submarine on the Vermillion Reef (PA-17) in about 120 feet of water.

The USS Clamagore has called the Charleston Harbor home since 1981 after it was decommissioned and donated to the state of South Carolina and Patriots Point for public display.

Discussions about preparing the submarine for reefing have been happening since at lest 2016 when a hazard assessment report was completed on the vessel.

Nearly $3 million was earmarked by lawmakers in the state budget last year to pay for the sinking project.

However, potential contractors are concerned about a pending legal battle happening in Charleston County courts. The USS Clamagore Restoration and Maintenance Association, Inc. filed a lawsuit in April 2019. The preservation group claimed the Patriots Point Development Authority doesn’t have the legal grounds to move the vessel and create a reef or underwater memorial offshore.

The group argued Patriots Point has a legal responsibility under state law and through contract with the United States to maintain the submarine.

In the lawsuit, the restoration group cited a piece of South Carolina code saying that no World War II, Korean War or Vietnam War memorial erected on public property of the state may be relocated, removed, disturbed or altered. The group claimed the Clamagore falls under that memorial status.

The group stated the Clamagore’s removal should be decided in the courtroom and that the United States donated the submarine to Patriots Point in 1979 with the idea that it would be used only as a museum and public memorial.

On March 2, a Charleston County judge dismissed the complaint and denied the group’s attempt to halt the project while legal proceedings advanced.

Attorney Nancy Bloodgood, who represents the Clamagore preservation group, said her clients plan to file a motion to amend the order and appeal it. The group could also ask for a supersedeas to suspend the authority of the Charleston County court to give them time to appeal the dismissal with the SC Supreme Court, according to Bloodgood.

“The Clamagore lawsuit asks for a declaration by the Court that the SC state laws which establish Patriots Point as a naval museum and provide for the maintenance and protection of historic assets, were not intended to allow Patriots Point to destroy historic assets such as the Clamagore,” Bloodgood said in a statement. “The issue before the Court was whether the Plaintiff, the Clamagore Restoration and Maintenance Association, had standing to bring the lawsuit. The Circuit Court held that the Association had no standing to challenge Patriots Point’s decisions regarding the Clamagore. The Court did not, however, rule on the merits of the case. Plaintiff Association will file a Motion with the Court to Alter or Amend its decision, and then it intends to appeal the issue of standing to the Court of Appeals.”

Potential contractors have submitted questions to PPDA regarding the legal proceedings. However, Patriots Point said they see no reason to expect the lawsuit to impact its ability to proceed with the project.

“The Plaintiff in the lawsuit seeks to force Patriots Point Development Authority to comply with Plaintiff’s interpretation of the enabling legislation that created this agency, and thereby, require the Patriots Point Development Authority to maintain and repair the submarine rather than disposing of it,” PPDA replied. “As with any legal dispute, there is the possibility the Court could render a decision unfavorable to the Patriots Point Development Authority. If that should occur, any inability of Patriots Point Development Authority to complete the project as scheduled would be handled in accordance with the contract terms and conditions.”

Meanwhile, there are also concerns about hazardous material aboard the submarine and the process to clean and strip the vessel before it is submerged.

According to a hazard assessment report released in 2016, approximately 500 batteries weighing about 1,500 pounds each will need to be removed as well as various sources of mercury. Oils, interior paints, exterior paints, cabling insulation, asbestos containing materials, fuels, antifreeze, sewerage, and PCB products will also have to be removed.

“At the present time, those involved with the project envision the vast majority of the submarine’s contents being removed in dry-dock to prepare for the reefing,” the report stated.

PPDA officials told bidders the ideal proposal would keep the vessel intact. However, Patriots Point is willing to divide the vessel into sections, if it’s necessary to meet the agency’s budget for the project.


Clamagore SS-343 - History

The 1945-built Balao class submarine U.S.S. Clamagore (SS-343) is one of 132 Gato, Balao, and Tench class submarines built during World War II. Clamagore was a typical World War II fleet boat built as part of a major submarine construction program that followed the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. The submarine warfare pursued by the United States and supported by this construction program was instrumental in securing an American victory in the Pacific. Of the hundreds of “fleet boats” built during the war, only 15, which include two subsequent GUPPY II conversions, Torsk and Becuna, remain preserved in the United States. Subsequently modified in 1947 and 1962 into a FRAM II/GUPPY III submarine by the U.S. Navy, Clamagore, one of only nine submarines converted to a GUPPY III, is now the only surviving GUPPY type III submarine in the United States. She represents the continued adaptation and use of war-built diesel submarines by the Navy for the first two decades after the war. The GUPPY (Greater Underwater Propulsion Project) or “fleet snorkel” submarines comprised the bulk of the nation’s submarine forces through the mid-1960s. Listed in the National Register June 29, 1989 Designated a National Historic Landmark June 29, 1989.

View the complete text of the nomination form for this National Register property.

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Post operational history

Clamagore was listed on the National Register of Historic Places and designated a National Historic Landmark on 29 June 1989. [10] [9] [11]

According to the South Carolina Department of Archives and History, Clamagore "is now the only surviving GUPPY type III submarine in the United States. She represents the continued adaptation and use of war-built diesel submarines by the Navy for the first two decades after the war." [15] The GUPPY conversion submarines constituted the bulk of the nation's submarine force through the mid-1960s.

On 10 January 2017 the Palm Beach County Commissioners voted unanimously to approve funds for the vessel to be sunk as an artificial reef. [16] On 16 April 2019 a group of retired submariners sued the State of South Carolina to save the Clamagore. [17] In early 2020, the museum formed a plan to sink Clamagore at the Vermilion Reef site before the 2021 hurricane season. [18]


Post operational history [ edit | edit source ]

USS Clamagore, 24 November 2003.

Clamagore was decommissioned 12 June 1975 and stricken on 27 June 1975. Ώ] ΐ] She was donated as a museum ship on 6 August 1979. [ citation needed ]

Clamagore arrived at Patriot's Point Naval & Maritime Museum, Charleston, South Carolina in May 1981, ⎗] where she was docked as a museum ship along with aircraft carrier Yorktown and destroyer Laffey. Clamagore is available for visitor tours. Her continually deteriorating condition, however, may lead to the sub being sunk as an artificial reef unless critical repairs can be made in a timely manner. ⎘]

Clamagore was listed on the National Register of Historic Places and designated a National Historic Landmark on 29 June 1989. ⎙] ⎚] ⎛]

According to the South Carolina Department of Archives and History, Clamagore "is now the only surviving GUPPY type III submarine in the United States. She represents the continued adaptation and use of war-built diesel submarines by the Navy for the first two decades after the war. The GUPPY conversion submarines comprised the bulk of the nation's submarine forces through the mid-1960s." ⎜]


Post operational history

Clamagore was decommissioned 12 June 1975 and stricken on 27 June 1975 after having served in the Navy for 30 years. She was donated as a museum ship on 6 August 1979.

Clamagore arrived at Patriot's Point Naval & Maritime Museum, Charleston, South Carolina in May 1981, where she was docked as a museum ship along with aircraft carrier Yorktown and destroyer Laffey. Clamagore is available for visitor tours. Her continually deteriorating condition, however, may lead to the sub being sunk as an artificial reef unless critical repairs can be made in a timely manner.

Clamagore was listed on the National Register of Historic Places and designated a National Historic Landmark on 29 June 1989.

According to the South Carolina Department of Archives and History, Clamagore "is now the only surviving GUPPY type III submarine in the United States. She represents the continued adaptation and use of war-built diesel submarines by the Navy for the first two decades after the war. The GUPPY conversion submarines comprised the bulk of the nation's submarine forces through the mid-1960s."


Watch the video: What is our history worth? USS Clamagore SS-343 (June 2022).


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